Sean Paul – Imperial Blaze – music reviews

Read the latest reviews from around the web for Sean Paul’s new album “Imperial Blaze”

Sean Paul Imperial Blaze
Sean Paul Imperial Blaze
Artist: Sean Paul
Title: Imperial Blaze
Label: Atlantic
Average of Ratings: 7/10

Latest reviews:

Entertainment Weekly: “Paul is arguably the ablest pop ambassador Jamaican music 
 has ever had who isn’t surnamed Marley.”
Rating: B+
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Express Night Out: “With lyrics like that, perhaps Jamaica’s social concerns just aren’t in Paul’s wheelhouse. But love and lust each sound the same in any culture — and that seems to be exactly what’s straight from Sean Paul’s heart.”
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Slant Magazine: “The best songs have a scuttling flow that plays laidback reggae off surging, modern hip-hop beats. But these moments are infrequent and fail to change the fact that as both a singer and MC Paul is a nonentity, a mostly featureless blob void of charisma.”
Rating: 1 1/2 out of 5
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USA Today: “He smartly sticks to his roots, and shows no signs of flaming out.”
Rating: 3 out of 4
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Jessie James – Jessie James – music reviews

Recorded in Los Angeles, New York, Nashville, and London, the album takes off with ‘Wanted’, the full-throttle Dance-Rock scorcher that Jessie co-wrote with American Idol judge and hit songwriter Kara DioGuardi. There’s also ‘Bullet’, a catchy Rock gem co-written with pal Katy Perry.

Jessie James
Jessie James
Artist: Jessie James
Title: Jessie James
Label: Mercury Records
Rating: 6.5/10

Corporate line: Recorded in Los Angeles, New York, Nashville, and London, the album takes off with ‘Wanted’, the full-throttle Dance-Rock scorcher that Jessie co-wrote with American Idol judge and hit songwriter Kara DioGuardi. There’s also ‘Bullet’, a catchy Rock gem co-written with pal Katy Perry.

Latest reviews:

Entertainment Weekly:
“Roots-music purists love to complain about their inability to distinguish current Nashville product from poppy Top 40 fare. This 20-year-old Georgia native never knew there was supposed to be a difference.”
Rating: B+
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Billboard.com: “Judging by some of the song titles (“Guilty,” “My Cowboy,” “Wanted”) on her self-titled debut, one could say that 20-year-old Georgia newcomer Jessie James lives up to her name as the female version of the American outlaw.”
Rating: 78
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Slant: “While she’s able to pull off that bad-girl vamp far more convincingly than Underwood, that isn’t saying much, and James certainly doesn’t hold a candle to Aguilera at her skankiest.”
Rating: 2/5 stars
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Roughstock: “She’s a unique enough talent, despite her real similarities to other artists, to recommend this album to anyone (probably under 30) who’s willing to look beyond genre definitions or who already is at least a little bit interested in pop music.”
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Green Day – 21st Century Breakdown – review

“21st Century Breakdown” is Green Day’s best-selling trio’s first studio album since 2004’s two-time Grammy Award-winning Punk Rock opera “American Idiot,” which debuted at #1 on the Billboard chart, spawned five hit singles, and went on to sell more than 12 million copies worldwide.

Green Day - "21st Century Breakdown"
Green Day - 21st Century Breakdown
Artist: Green Day
Title: 21st Century Breakdown
Label: Reprise
Rating: 7/10

Corporate line: “21st Century Breakdown” is Green Day’s best-selling trio’s first studio album since 2004’s two-time Grammy Award-winning Punk Rock opera “American Idiot,” which debuted at #1 on the Billboard chart, spawned five hit singles, and went on to sell more than 12 million copies worldwide. “21st Century Breakdown” is divided into three acts: “Heroes and Cons,” “Charlatans and Saints,” and “Horseshoes and Handgrenades,” and follows a young couple, Christian and Gloria, through the mess and promise of the century so far. Songs include “Know Your Enemy”, “21 Guns”, “East Jesus Nowhere”, “Before the Lobotomy”, and “Restless Heart Syndrome.”

Tracks:

“21st Century Breakdown” – Goes right for the Bush administration and its love for death and destruction and throws in a Wings-type bridge for good measure. And if you agree you’ll surely enjoy singing along to “scream America scream/ Believe what you see from heroes and cons/”

“Know Your Enemy” – The sentiment is clear and agreeable for most—probably all of those who listen to Green Day. But the song itself isn’t groundbreaking nor does it hold a candle to “American Idiot” and its pure urgency. It’s fairly lame paint by the numbers rock.

“Viva La Gloria” – Cute. But forgettable.

“Before The Lobotomy” – Starts slow and beautiful and then bursts alive. It should have stayed with the slower opening pace because as it bursts to life it also loses all its soul—that is until about the four minute mark where it actually gets exciting again and then ends shortly thereafter.

“Christian’s Inferno” – Skip it. Seriously.

“Last Night on Earth” – Unlike the other apocalyptical track “Christian’s Inferno,” this is gorgeous. It actually sounds unlike anything Green Day has done before. It shows that they can be a seriously good band from top to bottom. Best song, period.

“East Jesus Nowhere” – Someone told me that this track sounded like a Marilyn Manson song. They were right. It sounds all too familiar.

“Peacemaker”- I hate to say that this reminds me of Muse’s “Knights of Cydonia” but, well, it does. Too bad it’s not nearly as good.

“Last of the American Girls” – Even more daring, this sounds like Muse’s “Starlight.” Muse’s album was a concept album, too. Coincidence? Sorry. I’m a Green Day fan so it’s hard for me to draw that conclusion. But it sounds very, very similar.

“Murder City” – Another forgettable track.

“Viva La Gloria? [Little Girl]” – This version of Gloria was better than the last.

“Restless Heart Syndrome” – This is a really odd song because I’d have never guessed that it was a Green Day song. It could be on an Oasis album. I can’t imagine Green Day fans like this song and yet I find it extremely interesting and oddly good.

“Horseshoes and Handgrenades” – The first punk track. But its not as good as Green Day has been in the past.

“The Static Age” – Ugh.

“21 Guns” – I hate to say it, but I could see someone singing this on American Idol. It’s a pop song—the kind the ‘80s metal bands used to write. Seriously, it’s not that bad. Maybe its like candy, you know its bad for you and yet you can’t stop yourself.

“American Eulogy: Mass Hysteria/Modern World” – Yawn.

“See The Light” – Pretty.. Ditto “21 Guns.”

Finally: This is no Muse “Black Holes and Revelations” for certain. It’s not even Ziggy Stardust. It’s sort of going more for that Who generational angst. The question remains: does that matter? Yes. It’s a bit of a false revolution here. Obama is in office. The clouds seem to have parted and there is sunshine and rainbows. Green Day had perfect timing when they launched “American Idiot” but the shine is gone for “21st Century Breakdown.”

But then again “21st Century Breakdown” is fun to listen to and at the end of the day that is often all that matters.

Green Day “Know Your Enemy” video

Doves – Kingdom of Rust – review

The critically acclaimed and beloved British trio Doves return with their first album in four years, “Kingdom of Rust.” Comprised of brothers Jez and Andy Williams, and Jimi Goodwin, the trio has been recording the album for the past 18 months, having ensconced themselves to a farm house-come-studio in backwaters of Cheshire, England.

Doves Kingdom of Rust
Doves Kingdom of Rust
Artist: Doves
Title: Kingdom of Rust
Label: Astralwerks
Rating: 6.5/10

Corporate Line: The critically acclaimed and beloved British trio Doves return with their first album in four years, “Kingdom of Rust.” Comprised of brothers Jez and Andy Williams, and Jimi Goodwin, the trio has been recording the album for the past 18 months, having ensconced themselves to a farm house-come-studio in backwaters of Cheshire, England. They teamed up with long time Doves collaborator Dan Austin to co-produce all but 2 tracks of Kingdom Of Rust. For the remaining 2 tracks; “10.03” and “Winter Hill,” the group worked with ace producer John Leckie (Stone Roses,Radiohead).

The single “Kingdom of Rust”, lands in the broodier atmospherics of Lost Souls, strapped with a Johnny Cash bassline; “Jetstream” is a stomping Doves classic in waiting, fitted with a propulsive krautrock motorik, it inherits the bands dance DNA from their former Sub Sub extraction, with other searing standouts (“Greatest Denier”, “Lifeline”) rounding out this career defining album.

Review:
“Jetstream” – An interesting track that is part rock and part Kraftwerk. The interesting thing is that it doesn’t sound unique.

“Kingdom of Rust” – To come right off “Jetstream” into this track, which is more country than anything else, is a bit bizarre. Frankly, I’d rather hear the Doves doing these types of tracks rather than the prior. It fits them a lot better and it’s far better.

“The Outsiders” – This is a typical rock song. Seems the Doves decided to release a track that might be a bit more radio friendly.

“Winter Hill” – Another track that sounds written for the radio and at trying their best at producing an anthem. It doesn’t miss the boat entirely. It’s lovely just not inspiring.

“10:03” – Gloomy and sad and yet it sounds something like a spiritual track that should make us feel okay. It’s a bit confusing. And yet its quite good.

“The Greatest Denier” – Skip it. There’s nothing interesting here other than the Rolling Stone-esque instrumentation.

“Birds Flew Backwards” – This is a pretty song that sounds like they’ve been listening to a lot of the Beach Boys experimental albums. The only problem is that it sounds lyrically empty.

“Spellbound” – Forgettable.

“Compulsion” – The fact that it reminds me of disco and Duran Duran doesn’t bode well.

“House of Mirrors” – Again, this sounds like Duran Duran from the ‘80s. I can’t get into it at all.

“Lifelines” – This is strictly leftovers.

Finally:
The Doves get the best out of their first five songs and then offer up some average songs after that. It’s hard to proclaim this a must buy album when you can download the first few songs and get the best there is to offer.

The other issue with the album is too eclectic. They go from techno to country to spiritual to disco. I’d love to see them stick to one style and give it their best. If this would have been more like the title track, “Kingdom of Rust,” from beginning to end it would have been a home run.

Peter Doherty – Grace/Wastelands – review

Libertines and Babyshambles leader Peter Doherty finds himself constantly at the center of a hurricane of media attention, a windstorm of publicity that constantly keeps him in the public consciousness.

Peter Doherty - Grace Wastelands
Peter Doherty - Grace Wastelands
Artist: Peter Doherty
Title: Grace/Wastlands
Label: EMI
Rating: 8/10

Corporate line:
Libertines and Babyshambles leader Peter Doherty finds himself constantly at the center of a hurricane of media attention, a windstorm of publicity that constantly keeps him in the public consciousness.

“Grace/Wasteland” is a brave exploration into the eye of the hurricane. Recorded over a month of sessions in autumn 2008 at London’s legendary Olympic Studios with producer Stephen Street (The Smiths, Blur, Cranberries, Kaiser Chiefs), Peter Doherty brings to life a collection of songs many which have existed since the heady days with The Libertines. Without the guise of The Libertines and Babyshambles to hide behind, never before have we seen Doherty so personal, raw, and vulnerable in his songwriting. Ripe with lyrical insights, Doherty’s main themes are present and truthful – his troubles with youth, music, love and addiction are all revealed.

Adding color to Doherty’s compositions is Blur guitarist Graham Coxon, appearing on nearly every track, instilling in the music his pedigree and refi ned studio nous. Scottish singer Dot Allison (One Dove) and poet Peter “Wolfman” Wolfe also make contributions to the record.

Review:
“Arcady” – A beautiful song that trips along from a poet and his guitar. It’s the beauty of Doherty’s simple strumming with a nice melody that has made so many fall in love with his music.
“Last of the English Roses” – Doherty makes the simple beautiful. It sounds very familiar. Any fan of Babyshambles won’t find the verses anything new—however the chorus is simply beautiful.

“1939 Returning” – This is an interesting song. “Tread carefully so carefully/ Upon the drifting ice/ Caught behind enemy lines/ In 1939/ For Germany he sacrificed his life/
Caught behind enemy lines/ There in 1939.” If it all is meaningless its still beautiful with a gorgeous melody and Doherty’s voice to carry it along. A brilliant song. Doherty is all his glory.

“A Little Death Around the Eyes” – Quite a bizarre song about a woman who “cooks and cleans when I tell you to” and “screw when I tell you to.” It survives because of the soul of its singer.

“Salome” – Another score. Doherty writes the sweetest little ditties. Its amazing how stripped down and barren they are and yet he easily supports every moment.

“I Am the Rain” – “My cousin the snow lays blankets below” shows how simple little verses hooked into beautiful choruses can pass right through you and have you singing along as if you grew up with it.

“Sweet by and By”- This is a swing and miss. Doherty comes off like a hack and it would have been better to just leave this behind or throw it on a B-side.

“Palace of Bone” – Not entirely painful. It comes off as some bizarre hilly-billy rock track.

“Sheepskin Tearaway” f/Dot Allison – Maybe the worst song title ever, but don’t let that stop you from listening. It’s a surprisingly gorgeous. Allison is a perfect counterpart.

“Broken Love Song” – This song is saved by the chorus. Doherty is able to take nothing more than repetition of “they are the loneliest” and extend it into a charming melody.

“New Love Grows on Trees” – Doherty slips another gem in.

“Lady Don’t Fall Backwards” – Another one that could have been left behind.

Finally:
If you’ve been dying for a new Babyshambles record than you’ll be quite satisfied. If you’ve found that the old Doherty gems you’ve loved for years have grown old and you need something new to your teeth into then “Grace/Wastelands” fits the bill. This isn’t Doherty reinventing himself and it doesn’t matter. Fans love Doherty for his songs and ability to pull so much out of so little. “Grace/Wastelands” is no different. Doherty might add a bit more production but the songs remain the same. Tender, intimate and damn good.

Watch Peter Doherty talk about the album:

Watch the video for “The Last of the English Roses”

Keri Hilson – In a Perfect World – review

Nurtured between Timbaland’s Mosley Music Group and Polow’s Zone 4 Inc., “In A Perfect World…” boasts amazing sounds from a slew of hitmakers like Timbaland, Polow, and Danja. The album features guest appearances by Timbaland, Lil Wayne, Akon, Keyshia Cole, and Ne-Yo.

Keri Hilson - Perfect World
Keri Hilson - Perfect World
Artist: Keri Hilson
Title: In a Perfect World
Label: Interscope
Rating: 6/10

Corporate line:
Nurtured between Timbaland’s Mosley Music Group and Polow’s Zone 4 Inc., “In A Perfect World…” boasts amazing sounds from a slew of hitmakers like Timbaland, Polow, and Danja. The album features guest appearances by Timbaland, Lil Wayne, Akon, Keyshia Cole, and Ne-Yo. It’s a watershed moment that meets both goals-it sounds and feels great. Speaking up for all the ladies, In A Perfect World . . . also looks to empower women to be strong, independent and determined. “No human is exempt from the realities of life- heartbreak, failure, success…” Keri comments. This takes all forms throughout the album which reveals Keri’s ability to translate every day trials and tribulations into engaging music.

Review:
“Turning Me On” f/ Lil Wayne – Vanilla pop track with Lil Wayne doing his thing with digital vocal effects and all. We could use less of the vocal effects. Seriously. It’s getting old.

“Get Your Money Up” – Same deal. Vanilla pop song except this time Hilson takes the robotic vocal effects from Wayne and slaps them on her voice. It’s past lame.

“Return the Favor” f/Timbaland – Hilson gets to what she does best—singing. Timbaland offers a good partner as they go back and forth. Finally, Timbaland gets the best out of Hilson.

“Knock You Down” f/Kanye West & Neyo – Nice hook and again Hilson gets to show her chops.

“Slow Dance” – It’s slow and boring.

“Make Love” – Unlike “Slow Dance,” this ballad is actually sexy and interesting. It has a great hook and will instantly get you singing along.

“Intuition” – The middle portion of the album slows down too much and after two slower tracks “Intuition” starts to wear you out.

“How Does It Feel” – Ditto “Intuition”

“Hey Girl” f/T.Pain – Not a bad track, but there is a reason it comes so late in the album. It’s not up to par with the openers.

“Alienated” – There are parts of the song that are interesting but it’s not really cohesive and that keeps the song from being good.

“Tell Him the Truth” – Boring.

“Change Me” f/Akon – Finally, after a lot of painful tracks Akon joins Hilson and they put together a good song. Akon steals the show.

“Energy” – This comes down to the end of the album and its one of the best songs. I wonder why anyone decided to bury it.

“Where Did He Go?” – Hilson knows how to make a song sexy.

Finally: Keri Hilson is sexy and has some tracks that let her prove she can sing, too. But she doesn’t separate herself from all the other wanna-be divas.

The Prodigy – Invaders Must Die – review

The fifth studio album by the acclaimed and controversial British Electronic act. As one of the most successful and respected Dance groups of recent times, this album sees the return of both Keith Flint and Maxim to the fold for their most exciting album to date. Included are collaborations with Dave Grohl (Foo Fighters) and James Rushent (Does It Offend You Yeah).

The Prodigy - Invaders Must Die
The Prodigy - Invaders Must Die
Artist: The Prodigy
Title: Invaders Must Die
Label: R.E.D.
Rating: 6/10

Corporate line:
The fifth studio album by the acclaimed and controversial British Electronic act. As one of the most successful and respected Dance groups of recent times, this album sees the return of both Keith Flint and Maxim to the fold for their most exciting album to date. Included are collaborations with Dave Grohl (Foo Fighters) and James Rushent (Does It Offend You Yeah).

The good:
“Invaders Must Die” – Solid dance mix with one of the hottest beats you’ll hear in a long time. It’s the kind of beat that sings to you without needing to say a single word. Actually we wish no one would have said a word.

“Thunder” – Finally Prodigy get a good mix of vocals and beats –even if the same lyrics are repeated a hundred times: “I hear thunder/ but there’s no rain/ this type of thunder breaks walls and windowpane.”

“Warrior’s Dance” – A blitzing soundscape that gets so much closer to where you’d hope this trio would be by now. It’s got a spooky close encounters vibe three minutes in and it never relents.

“Omen Reprise” – It’s bizarre—the reprise actually sounds more relevant. I wonder where they dug up the Phantom of the Opera.

The rest:
“Run with the Wolves” – The reason most people don’t take Prodigy seriously isn’t the sick beats—it’s the stupid rhymes.

“Omen” – A track that sounds like Prodigy is trying way too hard to be dark and cool. It’s neither. The beats are fairly good—but the rhymes are crap.

“Colours” – The lyrics are horrible and the beats sound like colorful noise.

“Piranha” – Seriously? Who writes this crap anyway? It sounds like it came straight from some bad ‘70s movie.

Finally:
The bad news about The Prodigy is that they still don’t know how to get away from the crap. The good news is that The Prodigy can still tear it up. The “Invaders Must Die” album is completely schizophrenic. You have songs like “Invaders Must Die” and “Thunder” which can hang with their classics and then songs like “Piranha” which would get them tossed on their asses. Download the good and be glad you never heard the bad.

U2 – No Line On The Horizon – review

“No Line On The Horizon,” the new studio album from U2 is the band’s 12th studio album calls on the production talents of long-time collaborators Brian Eno and Danny Lanois, with additional production by Steve Lillywhite. The album is available in five different packages.

U2 - No Line on the Horizon
U2 - No Line on the Horizon
Artist: U2
Title: No Line on the Horizon
Label: Interscope
Rating: 6.5/10

Corporate line:
“No Line On The Horizon,” the new studio album from U2 is the band’s 12th studio album calls on the production talents of long-time collaborators Brian Eno and Danny Lanois, with additional production by Steve Lillywhite. The album is available in five different packages.

The good:

“No Line On The Horizon” – Not going to be confused with any of their best songs—it’ll still have you listening over and over again.

“Moment of Surrender” – This song should have been called “Magnificent.” This seven-minute track is a showstopper. It’s simply gorgeous and proves that even a simple song can leave a big impression.

“Breathe” – Might not be a great song—however its still one that hooks you in quickly and keeps you intrigued.

The rest:

“Get On Your Boots” – It’s hard to believe this is the first single. It’s one of the album’s weaker tracks and too full of generic rock. U2 at their most average.

“Magnificent” – A slushy song that doesn’t do anything.

Finally:

U2 is one of the few legendary groups the world still waits in anticipation to hear. Which makes “No Line on the Horizon” a let down. It’s hard to listen without expecting your world to be turned upside down. Instead “No Line on the Horizon” would be above average for most bands and merely average for U2. The instrumentation is great and some of the lyrics are good—and yet there are many songs that are far too trite. If only U2 didn’t have to be compared to U2.

U2 Rooftop performance of “Get On Your Boots”

The Fray – The Fray – review

2009 album from the Denver-based quartet, the follow-up to their enormously successful How To Save A Life. The Fray, who exploded into worldwide success with that album, have captured the skilled songwriting that broke them and, with the help of acclaimed producers Mike Flynn and Aaron Johnson, created a set of songs sure to make them household names.

The Fray - The Fray
The Fray - The Fray
Artist: The Fray
Title: The Fray
Label: Sony
Rating: You rate out of 10 (0/1)

2009 album from the Denver-based quartet, the follow-up to their enormously successful How To Save A Life. The Fray, who exploded into worldwide success with that album, have captured the skilled songwriting that broke them and, with the help of acclaimed producers Mike Flynn and Aaron Johnson, created a set of songs sure to make them household names. The band continues their licensing success story by collaborating with ABC’s hit show, Lost in a series of music video promos featuring the album’s first single, ‘You Found Me’ for the newest season of the show. The spots also ran during the 2008 American Music Awards, where the band was a featured performer. Over the weekend of the release and performance, the Lost video had over one million views.

The Review:
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Lily Allen – It’s Not Me, It’s You – review

“It’s Not Me, It’s You,” is the follow-up to Lily Allen’s critically acclaimed 2007 debut, Alright, Still. The album finds Lily in top form, creating a record Blender’s recent “In The Studio” feature described as “part God, part country and all middle finger.”

Lily Allen - It's Not me, It's You
Lily Allen - It's Not me, It's You
Artist: Lily Allen
Title: It’s Not Me, It’s You
Label: Capitol
Rating: 8/10

Corporate line:
“It’s Not Me, It’s You,” is the follow-up to Lily Allen’s critically acclaimed 2007 debut, Alright, Still. The album finds Lily in top form, creating a record Blender’s recent “In The Studio” feature described as “part God, part country and all middle finger.” Allen wrote and recorded the album’s 12 songs with producer Greg Kurstin (the bird and the bee), who worked with her on three songs for Alright, Still – “Everything’s Just Wonderful,” “Alfie” and “Not Big.”
On “It’s Not Me, It’s You,” Lily’s characteristically sharp observations find expression in a variety of musical styles, with influences ranging from the Jazz Era to country and western to dance music. “Highlights include `Everyone’s at It,’ a synth-pop song about prescription drugs that features Allen on xylophone; `He Wasn’t There,’ which matches emotional lyrics about her absent father to a jazz groove; and `Not Fair,’ a saucy country song about an inadequate lover,” said Rolling Stone.

“We decided to try and make bigger sounding, more ethereal songs, real songs,” says Lily, who will be touring the U.S. in the spring. “I wanted to work with one person from start to finish making it one body of work. I wanted it to feel like it had some sort of integrity. I think I’ve grown up a bit as a person and I hope it reflects that.”

The tracks:
“Everyone’s At It” – This is the track for hypocrites. “You go to the doctor/ You need pills to sleep in/ Well if you can convince him/ Then I guess that’s not cheating.” Allen calls out all the drug addicts whether they be addicted to heroin or sleeping pills.

“The Fear” – Allen is full of great lyrics: “I’ll take my clothes off and it will be shameless/ ’cuz everyone knows that’s how you get famous.” Beware—Allen is calling you out.

“Not Fair” – Allen likes a guy but is pissed not just because he suffers from premature ejaculation, but because he doesn’t take care of her in bed.

“22” – A woman who is 30 and looking back at 22. Guess 30 is the new 50 and Allen is able to make it sound so wonderful.

“I Could Say” – Pretty and tender. If Allen has already won you over by this point you’ll surely be memorized.

“Back To The Start” – The techno-beat doesn’t really do the song justice as Allen races to the end. The chorus is good—but the rest doesn’t do it.

“Never Gonna Happen” – The verses are interesting with an odd beat and an accordion to boot. Then the chorus gets out of wack with something that sounds straight from the ‘80s.

“F**k You” – “So sick and tired of all the hatred you harbor/ So you say It’s not okay to be gay/ Well I think you’re just evil” How could a chorus that goes “F**k you/ F**k you” sound so damn good? Not only is the song catchy, it’s also frank and inspiring. Allen isn’t afraid to take on jackasses at every turn.

“Who’d Have Known” – Simple verses, but the chorus blasts off forcing you to sing-a-long. Allen should cite Take That for the great hook she borrowed.

“Chinese” – The rare meaningless track and yet it’s like watching a movie that you know sucks but can’t help but enjoying.

“Him” – This doesn’t come of as good as Chinese.

“He Wasn’t There” – Allen is good to the last drop.

Finally:
Lily Allen is unique. Potent. Quality. Interesting. Fun. Good. Lily Allen is inspiring because she doesn’t fall into a category. You just find the lyrics inspired and deep and yet the songs are always worth singing along to.

Watch the video for “The Fear”